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Prop. 36 Fallout: Area Prisoners Expected to Seek Shorter Terms

Voters approved Proposition 36, the "three strikes" softening measure, on Nov. 6.

 

the statewide measure to amend the 1994 "three strikes" law was approved by voters by a large margin on Nov. 6.

Proposition 36 allows offenders who receive a third felony conviction that is non-violent or relatively less serious to be sentenced to a lesser penalty than the original law, which called for a 25-years-to-life commitment for a third felony offense.

Voters apparently were swayed by analysts who said the measure would save tax dollars spent on housing prisoners for life, would relieve prison overcrowding and  would reform sentencing guidelines to be less harsh for a person found guilty of a third felony that was non-violent.

As a result, the Press Democrat reported this weekend, the measure's passage is expected to lead to requests from dozens of area inmates for reduced prison terms.

North Coast defense lawyers are said to be in demand to prepare resentencing petitions -- although the number of offenders in Lake, Mendocino and Sonoma counties who could be eligible for the reduced terms is relatively low, the newpaper said.

Statewide, about 3,000 inmates could be eligible for resentencing, according to the article.

To read the article, click here.

sam oliva November 19, 2012 at 03:09 AM
insanity!...habitual criminals commit the overwhelming majority of crime.
Jen from oakland November 19, 2012 at 04:22 AM
According to the CDCR's own risk analyses, non-violent non-serious third strikers are the population least likely to re-offend upon release.
Reginald "Rex" Henderson November 19, 2012 at 02:45 PM
"as reported in Patch"...and everywhere else!
Wire November 21, 2012 at 05:08 PM
Do worry Sonoma county got an influx of millions to hire 54 social workers. The problem is the drug users doing the crime to pay for those drugs. It's not a high priority crime braking into cars or a house. UNLESS THERE'S A HANDGUN.
Dee Baucher November 24, 2012 at 12:58 AM
Least likely, compared to what?! Compared to people who have never committed crimes? For every crime that is caught and prosecuted....there are about 10 others that the criminal "got away" with. We are already living in a state of perpetual criminal assault. Do we really need to submit our communities to further threats and turmoil?
Dee Baucher November 24, 2012 at 01:09 AM
The lack of jobs (especially ones that actually pay a "living wage") means that criminal activity of every type will be increased. We are already living in a "state of siege". Paying salaries and pensions and benefits to more social workers, rather than actually funding the obvious necessary services for our seniors and disabled and homeless.... is just stupid and pointless. This reinforces why so many become disgusted with our government.
Frankie2011 December 03, 2012 at 05:45 AM
So true Dee. I recently read an article in the Petaluma Patch that reads - "Police are continuing to investigate the rise in home and business break-ins and say they have no idea about what’s driving the trend". What planet are they on?

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